Thought of the Week - 13th October 2021


Pre read: Matthew 11:28-30

Dear Friends, 

We hope you’ve had a good week and that you and your loved ones are all safe and well.

The fuel shortage seems to have run its course for now, thank goodness. For a while we had a small taste of what many people in many countries have to live with as part of normal life.

If you are planning to come to the Bereavement Service in St Mary’s on Sunday 31 October, please note that there has been a change of time. It will now be at 3.00pm – NOT 4.00pm as previously advertised. We hope this doesn’t cause you any inconvenience, but the change will allow folk to arrive and leave in daylight. During the service, will be remembering those who have died in the parish this past year, and if you would also like the names of your loved ones who have died in previous years to be read out as part of the service, please contact Lucy in the Parish Office.

May God bless you and your loved ones this coming week.


Bible Thought For The Week : Mathew 14:22-33

‘TAKE COURAGE! IT IS I. DON’T BE AFRAID!’

 Jesus made the disciples get into the boat and go on ahead of him to the other side of the Sea of Galilee, while he dismissed the crowd. After he had dismissed them, he went up on a mountainside by himself to pray.

Later that night, he was there alone, and the boat was already a considerable distance from land, buffeted by the waves because the wind was against it.

Shortly before dawn Jesus went out to them, walking on the lake. When the disciples saw him walking on the lake, they were terrified. ‘It’s a ghost,’ they said, and cried out in fear.

But Jesus immediately said to them: ‘Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid.’

‘Lord, if it’s you,’ Peter replied, ‘tell me to come to you on the water.’

‘Come,’ Jesus said.

Then Peter got down out of the boat, walked on the water and came towards Jesus. But when he saw the wind, he was afraid and, beginning to sink, cried out, ‘Lord, save me!’

Immediately Jesus reached out his hand and caught him. ‘You of little faith,’ he said, ‘why did you doubt?’

And when they climbed into the boat, the wind died down.

Then those who were in the boat worshipped him, saying, ‘Truly you are the Son of God.’

 

Jesus walking on water is one of the most well known scenes from the Gospels. It is so famous, it is easy to skim read it because of its familiarity. But the wonderful thing about the Bible is that if we come to it prayerfully, with hearts and minds open to God, then He is able to reveal Himself to us, and teach us new things, no matter how well we think we know a passage. This is because we are not the same as we were the last time we read it. We have grown; our circumstances are different; life has moved on.

So please read this passage slowly. Dwell on it. Let it percolate through your mind. What bits stand out to you? Then slowly read it again, out loud this time. Listen to your own voice. Notice the sound of the words on your tongue. Imagine the words melting in your mouth, like your favourite food. What is God saying to you through this passage? What do you ‘feel’?

This way of reading the Bible takes time, but it is worth persevering with. Pause and do that now, before you read the rest of this …

… … … …

A great encouragement from this passage is that Jesus is always with us. Sometimes though, it can seem as if he isn’t. It can seem as if we are on our own, struggling to make any headway in life. No matter how hard we try, the wind and the waves are against us. Through it all, Jesus says to us, ‘Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid!’ Whatever the storms of life do, our eternal life is ultimately secure in the arms of Jesus. And if we get to that point where we feel the waves are overwhelming us - then Peter’s cry of ‘Lord, save me!’ is the most simple and most powerful prayer any of us can pray. Because in these three short words – ‘Lord, save me!’- we are forced to admit our own inability to save ourselves, and we recognise Jesus as our Lord and Saviour. The name ‘Jesus’ actually means, ‘God saves’.

The reality is that no matter how ‘good’ our life is, how successful or able we are, we still cannot save ourselves. Only Jesus can save us. May you know that you are held by Jesus forever. And if you want to talk to John, Richard or Steve, please call us – our numbers are below. 


With love and prayers

from all at St Paul’s, St Peter’s and St Mary’s


Bible Readings


Click to read the Bible reading for the week: Colossians 1:9-13  Luke 17:11-18


Please pray for

  • Those who are sick in body, mind or spirit: especially  Nicholas Roynon and John Keast, 
  • Those who mourn, thinking particularly of the loved ones of Frances Williams and Joan Moore
  • Residents and staff at The Mount Care Home
    The staff at the Surgery
  • Give thanks for all that is good in your life


Pre read: 2Timothy 4:7-8

Dear Friends,

We hope you’ve had a good week and that you and your loved ones are all safe and well.

After 19 days, the Olympic Games 2020 came to an end last Sunday. Delayed for a year because of Covid, the athletes worked towards those games for 5 years, struggling through all the Covid restrictions as well as their own limitations. In 2 weeks’ time the Para Olympics will begin, with those athletes also having persevered against all odds to make it to that great celebration of human endurance and excellence.

In the Bible verses above, the apostle Paul is writing what may well be a final farewell to his good friend Timothy. Paul senses he is approaching the end of his life, but rather than fear it, he sees it as a great victory for which the greatest reward – a place in the Kingdom of Heaven - is waiting for him. May we all have that same confidence in Jesus Christ as our Lord and Saviour, and may God bless you and your loved ones this coming week.                                           

With love and prayers

from all at St Paul’s, St Peter’s and St Mary’s


This week we continue our occasional series on Prayer,

taken from ‘Prayer: Where to Start and How to Keep Going’,

by Stephen Cottrell, Archbishop of York.

 

HOW DO I BUILD PRAYER INTO EVERYDAY LIFE?

Most of us have routines that shape the day. One of the ways of developing a life of prayer is to weave times of prayer into these existing rhythms and routines. Each point in the day lends itself to a different sort of praying:


First thing in the morning

When you get up in the morning, use this as an opportunity to welcome the new day. Dedicate the day to God, asking for God’s blessing on you and your loved ones through the day, and for you to able to be a blessing to those you will meet.


As I rejoice in the gift of this new day,

so may the light of your presence O God,

set my heart on fire with love for you,

now and forever. Amen.


At mealtimes

Eating is one of the main routines that shape a day. When you sit down to eat, say a prayer of thanksgiving for your food: for those who plant and grow and pick and transport and stack and sell the food that ends up on your plate. This can also be an opportunity to give thanks to God for all the good things in your life and remember those who do not have the luxury of regular meals.


Lord Jesus, thank you for this food,

for those who have produced it,

for those who have prepared it,

(and for those with whom I share it.)

Thank you for those I love most.

I lift to you all who hunger:

 for food, for shelter, for love and for you.

As I eat, help me to remember your provision and goodness with a thankful heart. Amen.


As you exercise

If you take a daily walk (or run or cycle) you are likely to be on your own. Why not use this as an opportunity to pray for others as well as yourself. Perhaps list in your mind the people you are concerned about and the other things that are closest to your heart.


At the end of the day

When we go to bed, we think back over the day and we bring to God the things that have gone well and the things that have gone wrong. We thank God for the blessings of the day and say sorry for those things we have got wrong. We entrust ourselves and our loved ones into God’s hands asking for peace and rest throughout the night.


Save us, O Lord, while waking, and guard us while sleeping,

that awake we may watch with Christ

and asleep we may rest in peace. Amen.


Not all these things will work for everyone. Some things that work one day, won’t work so well the next. Find the way of praying that is right for you, and then build on it, trying other new things from time to time.

(Stephen Cottrell, Archbishop of York)

 

Pre read: 2Timothy 4:7-8

Dear Friends,

We hope you’ve had a good week and that you and your loved ones are all safe and well.

After 19 days, the Olympic Games 2020 came to an end last Sunday. Delayed for a year because of Covid, the athletes worked towards those games for 5 years, struggling through all the Covid restrictions as well as their own limitations. In 2 weeks’ time the Para Olympics will begin, with those athletes also having persevered against all odds to make it to that great celebration of human endurance and excellence.

In the Bible verses above, the apostle Paul is writing what may well be a final farewell to his good friend Timothy. Paul senses he is approaching the end of his life, but rather than fear it, he sees it as a great victory for which the greatest reward – a place in the Kingdom of Heaven - is waiting for him. May we all have that same confidence in Jesus Christ as our Lord and Saviour, and may God bless you and your loved ones this coming week.                                           

With love and prayers

from all at St Paul’s, St Peter’s and St Mary’s


This week we continue our occasional series on Prayer,

taken from ‘Prayer: Where to Start and How to Keep Going’,

by Stephen Cottrell, Archbishop of York.

 

HOW DO I BUILD PRAYER INTO EVERYDAY LIFE?

Most of us have routines that shape the day. One of the ways of developing a life of prayer is to weave times of prayer into these existing rhythms and routines. Each point in the day lends itself to a different sort of praying:


First thing in the morning

When you get up in the morning, use this as an opportunity to welcome the new day. Dedicate the day to God, asking for God’s blessing on you and your loved ones through the day, and for you to able to be a blessing to those you will meet.


As I rejoice in the gift of this new day,

so may the light of your presence O God,

set my heart on fire with love for you,

now and forever. Amen.


At mealtimes

Eating is one of the main routines that shape a day. When you sit down to eat, say a prayer of thanksgiving for your food: for those who plant and grow and pick and transport and stack and sell the food that ends up on your plate. This can also be an opportunity to give thanks to God for all the good things in your life and remember those who do not have the luxury of regular meals.


Lord Jesus, thank you for this food,

for those who have produced it,

for those who have prepared it,

(and for those with whom I share it.)

Thank you for those I love most.

I lift to you all who hunger:

 for food, for shelter, for love and for you.

As I eat, help me to remember your provision and goodness with a thankful heart. Amen.


As you exercise

If you take a daily walk (or run or cycle) you are likely to be on your own. Why not use this as an opportunity to pray for others as well as yourself. Perhaps list in your mind the people you are concerned about and the other things that are closest to your heart.


At the end of the day

When we go to bed, we think back over the day and we bring to God the things that have gone well and the things that have gone wrong. We thank God for the blessings of the day and say sorry for those things we have got wrong. We entrust ourselves and our loved ones into God’s hands asking for peace and rest throughout the night.


Save us, O Lord, while waking, and guard us while sleeping,

that awake we may watch with Christ

and asleep we may rest in peace. Amen.


Not all these things will work for everyone. Some things that work one day, won’t work so well the next. Find the way of praying that is right for you, and then build on it, trying other new things from time to time.

(Stephen Cottrell, Archbishop of York)

 

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